About Joe Pace

Joe is the Founder of Icewater Yoga. Fascinated by the intersection of yoga and sport, his goal is to help athletes develop a consistent yoga practice. He lives in Claremont, CA with his wife, Jill.

Hitting Pause: Joe Pace

About this Episode:

A very brief episode announcing the end of season 1 of the Clutch Podcast.

Season 2 will be coming soon with a fresh new look: potent and interesting conversations that you can enjoy in 10-15 minute packages.

I would greatly appreciate if you could rate and review the podcast to support me and the show.

Thank you and I look forward to sharing Season 2 with you all!

– Joe

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed for athletes and movers.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

Working for Peace: Mado Hesselink

About this Episode:

Joe and Mado Hesselink (Creator of teachingyoga.net and host of the Yoga Teacher Resource podcast) explore the following topics:

:: Discovering how yoga isn’t just about flexibility

:: How effort and work can lead to peace and tranquility

:: Understanding how yoga can permeate into our day-to-day lives

About Mado:

After discovering Martial Arts in college, Mado found her way to yoga in order to balance her body from the intensity of martial arts training. Once she became a mother, she devoted herself fully to yoga and started teaching in 2005.

After teaching full time for several years, Mado learned the importance of cross training and began to incorporate other types of movement into her life, specifically hiking, crossfit and aerial arts. She also loves to have mid day toddler dance parties in her living room with her youngest child and friends.

Mado’s passion is training and mentoring other yoga teachers, which she does by hosting/producing the Yoga Teacher Resource Podcast and through private and group coaching programs. Find out more about the podcast and how to work with her at http://www.teachingyoga.net

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed for athletes and movers.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

How to Walk: Jonathan FitzGordon

About this Episode:

Joe and Jonathan FitzGordon (Creator of CoreWalking) explore the following topics:

:: What is proper walking alignment and technique?

:: What are common misalignments and mistakes in walking?

:: How can improper walking technique lead to injury?

:: Why is it important to walk correctly?

About Jonathan:

The CoreWalking Program was born out of Jonathan FitzGordon‘s personal and professional experience with changing the body’s habitual movement patterns through self-awareness and repetition.

The program’s philosophy rests on the rock solid belief in our ability to change and evolve as we age. Jonathan learned this first hand. After stubbornly suffering through three knee surgeries and repeatedly re-injuring himself, Jonathan decided to step back a take a good look at how the body works. Injury free these many years later, the walking program aims to help people age gracefully and live pain free lives.

Jonathan has been practicing yoga since 1995 and has been teaching since 2000, having studied with some of the yoga community’s leading teachers. He owned and operated the Yoga Center of Brooklyn from 2001-2009 and created the CoreWalking Program in 2005 because walking is something we all do and walking correctly is an amazing way to bring positive change to our aging bodies.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed for athletes and movers.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

What is movement?: Josh Halbert

About this Episode:

Joe and Josh Halbert (Functional Range Systems & Kinstretch Master instructor) explore the following topics:

:: What does it mean to teach “movement”?

:: How should we move based on human evolution?

:: What is “kinstretch” and how is it unique?

:: How do we sift through information (and misinformation) in the world of fitness, health, and wellness?

About Josh:

Josh works on expanding his movement practice through gymnastic strength training, mobility and outdoor adventures. Josh looks at human health as a complex and dynamic system. This system is comprised of different interdependent parts including lifestyle, nutrition, sleep, physical training, mindset, and recovery. Proper management of these parts facilitates one to achieve their full human potential. He continues to grow his knowledge as a coach in all these subjects so that he can better serve the people he trains.

He is a Functional Range Systems (FRS) Master Instructor, Kinstretch Master instructor and he travels around the world to teach and certify people in the FRS specialty certifications.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed for athletes and movers.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

What is Anusara Yoga?: Keric Morinaga

About this Episode:

Joe and Keric explore the topic of Anusara Yoga, what it means, and his passion for reviving the style.

Visit https://icewateryoga.com/classes/ and use the filter to see all of Keric’s classes on Icewater Yoga.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

Choosing the Company You Keep: Yancy Schwartz

About this Episode:

Joe and Yancy discuss Yancy’s path to discovering yoga multiple times through skateboarding, relationships, travel, and dedication. Yancy shares insight on how to live a clear, focused, and compassionate life.

Visit https://icewateryoga.com/classes/ and use the filter to see all of Yancy’s classes on Icewater Yoga.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

Soccer, Football, Acting, Yoga: Will Staten

About this Episode:

Joe and Will discuss Will’s path to becoming a yoga teacher from growing up in San Antonio as a football and soccer player, moving to L.A. to pursue a career in acting, and rehabbing himself back from a soccer injury through yoga.

About Will:

Visit https://icewateryoga.com/classes/ and use the filter to see all of Will’s classes on Icewater Yoga.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

Yoga Anatomy and Philosophy: Paul Grilley

About this Episode:

Joe and Paul discuss concepts in anatomy and philosophy as they relate to yoga. Paul details his thoughts on “the rebound”, which is a key concept in his teaching of physical yoga. As the conversation deepens, Paul explores deeper concepts of yoga philosophy and shares his own personal beliefs.

About Paul:

In the spring of 1979 Paul Grilley was inspired to study yoga after reading Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda. After two years’ study of anatomy with Dr. Garry Parker, he relocated from his home in Columbia Falls, Montana, to Los Angeles to continue his studies at UCLA. While in L.A., Paul furthered his study of yoga and began to teach.

Paul’s personal yoga practice took him into Ashtanga, where he experienced the joys (and consequent dangers) of doing too many drop backs into urdhva dhanurasana (the Wheel). He also ran a Bikram’s studio and studied that form of practice. One day, Paul stumbled across a locally televised martial arts interview that featured Paulie Zink. While Paulie’s martial arts demonstration was impressive, what really caught Paul’s attention was his flexibility. Paul contacted Paulie through the TV station. Paulie invited him to attend an ongoing class. It was Paulie who introduced Paul to the basics of Doaist Yoga.

While Paulie Zink whetted Paul’s appetite to learn more about Daoism, his understanding deepened when, in 1990, Paul met Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama. Through Dr. Motoyama’s teachings Paul began to see the connection between the asana practices he had been doing and Dr. Motoyama’s theory of the meridians. Paul went to Japan to learn more about the way our body’s physical and energetic structures are connected through the chakra system.

Paul combined the knowledge he had been given on anatomy, Daoist Yoga, and the meridian theory into the core of his Yin Yoga teachings. His teachings resonated with many people who recognized the benefits of the practice and related to the model of the body/mind/soul Paul offered. One student, who found this practice compelling and highly beneficial to her meditation practice, was Sarah Powers.

From 1998 to 2000 Paul took a sabbatical and relocated to Santa Fe where he earned a master’s degree from St. John’s College in the study of the Great Books of the Western World. In 2005 he received an honorary PhD from the California Institute of Human Science, founded by Dr. Motoyama. He currently teaches yoga and anatomy worldwide with his wife Suzee.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

Best Yoga Pose For Lower Back Pain

If I had a dime for every time someone asked me for a good lower back stretch…

Who cares how much money I’d have — the answer is never helpful.

“Yoga” is often considered synonymous with “stretching” and one of the first steps taken to fix back pain is, yup, stretching.

So, of course there’s a “yoga stretch” that’s for back pain, right?

Maybe.

Back pain is a really a complicated issue, but a very obvious contributor to back pain is back weakness.

Wait, can yoga help build back strength?

Definitely.

But, I never hear “do you know any good ways to strengthen my back with yoga?” and that’s really too bad, because that’s the perfect question for someone with mild back pain to ask.

By sitting when we work, eat, drive, and everything else, we tend to disengage the back muscles and, day after day, they get weaker and weaker.

Fast forward a few years, and here comes some nerve impingement, spinal discs bulging, and vertebrae crunching into one another. If only there was a yoga stretch, wait, pose that could stretch, wait, strengthen the back to help prevent this from happening in the first place…

There certainly is friends, and it’s called locust pose.

The beauty of locust is it’s not beautiful. It doesn’t look impressive and it doesn’t really feel that great when you have a weak back. Of all the back bends, it’s the least glamorous, but it might be the most necessary for our hunchy-crunchy backs.

Because no one wants to do it, teachers tend to avoid it and we all miss opportunities to build strength that we need so desperately. But, when you do do it, you’re essentially contracting your entire back body to work against gravity in the opposite direction gravity is pulling you in all day.

It’s essentially a big middle finger to gravity when you get right down to it.

So, while everyone else is taking that glorious upward facing dog, you can be the person that’s lownto the ground, looking unimpressive, and building strength that will help you avoid back pain.

In this quick video, learn how to do the best yoga pose for back pain and appreciate why you should never ask for a lower back stretch ever again!

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

The Wisdom of Yin Yoga: Bernie Clark

About this Episode:

Joe and Bernie discuss the many benefits of Yin Yoga from Eastern and Western perspectives.

About Bernie:

Bernie Clark, author of the best selling The Complete Guide to Yin Yoga, has had a passion for science, health, sports and spirituality since childhood. He has a degree in science from the University of Waterloo and spent over 25 years as a senior executive in the high-tech/space industry. Bernie has been investigating the path of meditation for over 4 decades and began teaching yoga and meditation in 1998

He conducts yoga teacher trainings several times a year and aims to build bridges between the experiences of yoga and the understandings of modern science. Other books written by Bernie include From the Gita to the Grail: Exploring Yoga Stories & Western Myths; YinSights; and the recent Your Spine, Your Yoga which is book two of the Your Body, Your Yoga trilogy. He is also the creator of the YinYoga.com website. Bernie offers courses online as well as in person in Vancouver, Canada.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

How to Wheel: Hard Yoga Poses Made Easy

In the ‘Hard Yoga Poses Made Easy’ series, we focus on a particular yoga pose or skill that seems (or is) very difficult and we make it a lot easier by breaking it down into actionable, realistic, and sequential steps.

In this tutorial, we set our sights on Wheel Pose.

Wheel looks like it’s just a big ole backbend and all you really need is to just be able to bend backwards a whole lot.

But when you start to piece it together, there’s a lot more going on.

First, the spine needs to not only bend backwards (in spinal extension), but the back needs to be strong enough to support the pose. To establish this primary need for Wheel pose (and life) we start with Locust pose for step 1. Pure back strengthening might feel like a pain at first, but it’s totally worth it.

Supporting the Wheel backbend starts with the back, but it also need to be supported by the traction in the front of the body. It also needs the frontal core and chest to be mobile enough to lift into the arching position, which is why step 2 details Camel pose. It’s a key “traction” back bend and will teach you how to use the front of the body to bend in the back of the body.

This one is pretty sneaky and not many people realize this, but the hips and shoulders need to be quite mobile to come into full Wheel. With tight shoulders, it’s almost impossible to place the hands and palms securely on the mat which keep the wrists protected. With tight hip flexors, it’s very difficult to extend at the hip joint, bringing excess back ending into the low back. To square all of this away, we use low lunge with an overhead shoulder opener.

Getting closer to the actually Wheel shape, we next focus and on bridge pose and working to develop an even backbend throughout the spine, with no individual area of the spine feeling the backbend more than another.

With the alignment learned in Bridge and the skills developed in steps 1-3, you’re ready to start playing with the idea of moving into Wheel pose.

Make sure to keep as little weight in the head as possible when it’s in contact with the ground and start with your chin towards your chest. You’re not going to win any medals for looking towards the ground. Trust me, I’ve tried.

Wheel pose is super energizing and brings a sense of vitality into the body. With so much of our physical movement beginning in and connecting to the spine, this pose is a panacea for any athlete looking to stay athletic for a long time.

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

Yoga for Athletes – Most Common Mistakes

Yoga was a huge part of my life when I was playing college baseball. I found it and got hooked pretty quickly.

No matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t get my teammates to enjoy it with me. At the time, I thought it was because they didn’t want to be the only dudes in a class full of women, but looking back on it I think the reason was something completely different.

In a way, yoga asks an athlete to do everything they’ve been trained not to do. Slowing down, not pushing through physical limits, breathing, being present, and taking criticism are all foreign subjects to athletes.

Even though it may seem like it’s mostly about flexibility and not feeling comfortable in a room full of yoga pants, it’s actually about learned behavior and culture.

When athletes finally break through and make their way into a yoga class, or do a random yoga class on YouTube, they bring their competitor athletic mindset to the yoga mat and, inevitably, they don’t have much fun. I’ve heard every excuse — it’s boring, it’s confusing, it’s too hard, it’s too easy — and it all comes down to discomfort and not being open to a new approach towards physicality.

If I can do anything with my yoga teaching, it would be to help athletes get more enjoyment and benefit from yoga. The beauty of this is it’s actually pretty simply if you know some key things to avoid.

In this discussion, I touch on the three most common mistakes I see athletes make in yoga:

  1. Impatience
  2. Distractedness
  3. Stubbornness

I hope this short video reaches as many athletes as possible so they can shift their perspective and approach when it comes to yoga.

There’s more potential in yoga than you think, you just have to look beyond the yoga pants.

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

The Best Yoga Warm-up for Athletes

Sun Salutation C is the best yoga warm-up for athletes (in my opinion)

As a contemporary yoga teacher, there’s always tension between sticking with tradition and updating the practice to accommodate advances in science.

For traditional yoga poses and sequences, there’s usually something not quite tangible about why I like or do them, but it just seems to feel right (even if it may be way off from an physiological standpoint). And, to be honest, sometimes the most “scientifically accurate” way of doing yoga is painfully boring.

Just the other day I saw a social media post from an anatomically-driven yoga teacher and they were doing pushups with their knees on the ground and hands on a stability ball. Wow, this was very boring to watch. Sure, this is a good move for people with tight wrists, or shoulders, or some other condition, but some of us just want to use our bodies and not worry so much about putting bubble wrap on every part of our body during the process.

This is especially endemic in the world of yoga for athletes. For some reason, yoga teachers think that athletes use their bodies so much in their sport that they can’t be challenged at all on the yoga mat. Sure, a purely traditional (say “ashtanga”) yoga practice is probably not the best call for most athletes. But, there has to be a middle ground where athletes can face some adversity on the yoga mat and, yes, maybe tweak something here and there.

Following that comment, let me reassure you, I have no interest in hurting people

Which is why I’m interested in helping athletes find the most beneficial edge for their bodies in yoga. With an intelligent and patient approach, we can use traditional yoga technique while minimizing risk (and actually have fun the process!).

If you’ve ever seen or read “War of the Worlds” you know that no matter how powerful you are, you need to expose yourself to some adversity (in the case of the Aliens in the movie/book, bacteria) to stay alive. And this is the thinking I applied in developing my opinion for the best yoga warm-up for athletes.

Why I chose Sun Salutation C as the best yoga warm-up for athletes

I chose Sun Salutation C because it’s “traditional” (i.e. every yoga teacher knows what it is) and also physiologically sound (i.e. it’s helps warm up the body with minimal physical risk), but not overly so on either side of the spectrum.

I also like this sequence because most teachers know it but, for some reason, don’t teach it very much. We see a lot of Sun A and Sun B in the yoga world, but Sun C gets kicked to the curb even though it warms up the most important body parts used by athletes: the hip flexors, spine, back, hamstrings, and core.

In this tutorial, I provide a full overview of the sequence of Sun C and its benefits as well as a “real-time” demonstration and review of how to do the sequence in a continuous flow (feel free to repeat this part to get a nice warm-up out of the deal).

There’s probably someone out there that is going to disagree with my stance on how we should treat athletes in yoga, and yoga in general. That ok and I invite the discussion.

Enjoy the warm-up and, more importantly, the approach to it that beings tradition and science into balance.

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

Basketball and Yoga: Kent Katich

About this Episode:

Joe and Kent discuss Kent’s path from growing up in Iowa, leaving a basketball scholarship, becoming a Georgio Armani model touring the world, to discovering yoga while playing professional basketball throughout Europe, to starting a business teaching yoga to NBA players and professional athletes.

About Kent:

For almost two decades, LA-based yoga teacher Kent Katich has been instrumental in the implementation of yoga training into athletic programs throughout the country.

Working with numerous top athletes throughout his career, Katich’s list of all-stars include NBA All Pros Kevin Love, Blake Griffin, Chris Paul and future Hall of Famer Dirk Nowitzki along with MLB super star Giancarlo Stanton, and the men’s national German Olympic Basketball team.

Katich has been a feature on ESPN and Inside the NBA, as well as in Men’s Journal, People, and Sports & Fitness magazines and has been part of the extended staff of the LA Clippers for the past ten years.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

What is Yin Yoga? Yoga for Every Athlete

The most important missing piece from most training plans: patience.

And it’s not only missing from our training, but also most aspect of our lives. We hate to wait, and that’s why this video is under two minutes.

For those wondering what “yin yoga” is and why it might be important, this brief video will give you a small beginning to your questions.

In my opinion, yin yoga is the ultimate off day training option for athletes, whether in-season or out of season. It makes perfect sense as a complement to vigorous, high intensity training because it approaches the body with complementary gentleness and patience.

Yin yoga puts the body in a pose and, instead of going as deep into that pose as possible for a short period of time, yin asks you to find the place where you just start to feel the pose and then hold it for a long time (at least 3 minutes).

This shallow and long stretch addresses the muscles to a degree and, more importantly, gives the more dense, plasticky, connective tissues in the body (in particular the fascia) time to slowly stretch and become more dynamic and adaptive.

Though often overlooked, the fascia is critically important to a high-functioning body because it encases every muscle in the body and ties the various systems of the body together in fabric-like network.

This raises the topic of “tensegrity” (a contraction of tension and integrity) which refers to the concept of individual areas of the body that connect to other areas of the body. Without going into too much detail, the principle of tensegrity in the human body supports the idea that movements, tightness, inflammation, and any other physical condition felt in one part of the body has a chain reaction and a direct connection to all other parts of the body in some way.

Put simply, when we’re tight in one area (say, the hamstrings) this tightness can lead to tightness and pain in other parts of the body (like the lower back).

Of course, some of the connection can be attributed to the muscles of the body, but the fascia also contribute greatly to the quality of tensegrity we experience (or miss out on) in the body.

This brief piece of writing only begins to scratch the surface of the body of information that can be shared about yin yoga, and that’s exactly what it’s intended to be.

For the athletes out there: yin yoga is most likely the biggest missing piece from your training. The physical benefits are the first changes you’ll notice and, while these are taking place, you’ll also find a deep well of relaxation and meditation that’s simultaneously physical and mental. Yin yoga will help you recover in so many ways and I hope you decide to make the time for it.

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

How Often Should You Practice Yoga?

Two 30-minute yoga sessions per week is the sweet spot.

In my experience, this is the best yoga is consistent yoga. If your main physical practice is yoga or yoga-based, finding time to do some form of yoga every day probably isn’t a problem.

For athletes, goals are pretty specific and they probably have very little to do with advancing a yoga practice. In their case, yoga is a tool to advance in their sport or non-yoga training, making yoga relevant but not a top priority.

My goal is to help athletes develop the most realistic and beneficial yoga program for their training, and that means being as efficient as possible and making every second of yoga count.

Realistically, an athlete has time commitments to direct training in their sport, which will suck up a lot, if not all, of their free time.

Going to a yoga studio is probably not an option because it adds a commute, parking, interacting with other people (not a bad thing, but it takes time) and the studio class will spend a lot of time addressing things that aren’t immediately beneficial to the athlete.

So, an at-home option is going to be best, but there needs to be enough time spent on the mat to get significant benefit. In my experience, 30 minutes is the perfect amount of time for an athlete’s single yoga session. A lot of teachers will tell you that you need to practice for at least an hour, but they’re also probably not athletes…

By doing two 30-minute sessions per week, you can realistically fit the sessions into your schedule either before or after a training session, on the weekend, at lunch, or in any small pocket of time that makes sense.

Also, doing two sessions per week gives you a chance to work two sides of the yoga spectrum: restorative and active. While one 30-minute session cools your down, stretches you out, and gives you space to relax and find new openings in the body, the other session pushes you and adds a dynamic, full-body workout into your routine.

In my experience, this approach has the most potential for helping you both maintain longevity and become more dynamic as an athlete.

As an athlete myself, I can say that this works for me and for a lot of people I work with.

Ultimately, as with everything in yoga, it comes back to finding balance. Between productivity/unproductivity, training/competing, relaxation/activity, striving/non-striving, and making things happen vs. letting them come to you.

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

Running On Yoga: Ryan Miller

About this Episode:

Joe and Ryan discuss running shoe design, running, rising up to life’s challenges, and using yoga philosophy and technique to improve various aspects of our lives.

About Ryan:

Ryan Miller is a running coach and Kripalu Yoga teacher. He was a provisional national qualifier in the 10K and a five-time all–New England award-winner in college. A founding member of the Sisu Project running club, a post-collegiate club focused on health and wellness, Ryan brings a unique and refreshing training philosophy that allows runners to feel inspired and excited about every run.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Start your two-week free trial: https://icewateryoga.com/product/monthly-subscription/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

How to Breathe in Yoga

When you know how to breathe, you know how to work on yourself.

I’m a big fan of a yoga teacher named Jason Crandell. If you haven’t heard of him, definitely Google him and get to know him a little better.

I mention that because I want to give him credit for an incredibly powerful perspective he shared on the importance of the breath in yoga.

It goes something like this:

“The movement of the body set a cadence for the breath. The movement of the breath sets a cadence for the mind. The movement of the mind sets a cadence for the nervous system.”

I love this because it highlights the breath as the link between the body and mind that allows yoga’s influence on the nervous system to take place.

Put another way, if we’re not breathing with intention in yoga, we’re missing the opportunity to influence one of the most critical drivers of who we are, what we do, and how we do it: the nervous system.

Put yet another way, if we’re not breathing with intention in yoga, we’re not doing yoga.

I understand why the breath isn’t the most popular focal point in a yoga class. Most people (including myself) original came to yoga for its physical benefits. We want a yoga body and to feel good and, in my opinion, there’s really nothing wrong with that.

But, as you keep coming back to yoga, there comes a point where working on just the physical aspects of our being becomes painful, boring, or both. When we start to appreciate the breath and its applications, we uncover our first experiences in the deeper, meaningful, and transformational aspects of yoga.

The first step on this path is learning how to do victorious breathing, also known as “ujjayi”.

In this video tutorial, I review the primary benefits of this breathing technique (breath regulation and warming, and bringing our mind to a single pointed focus) and also detail simple technical aspects to help you figure it out very quickly.

To be honest, figuring out the technique is pretty easy and straightforward for most people. What’s difficult is applying it and learning to listen to it as you practice yoga.

With that, I’ll leave you with two challenges:

  1. Next time you do a yoga class, can you maintain ujjayi breath the whole time?
  2. When you inevitably start to lose control of your ujjayi breath, due to physical intensity or distraction, can you listen to it and adjust your approach accordingly?

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide

The Honest Startup: Jake Wood

About this Episode:

Joe and Jake talk about choices in entrepreneurship, staying honest with yourself in the process of figuring it all out, and where yoga fits into it all.

Here’s a link to the product of Icewater Yoga’s partnership with Jake’s company, ‘So We Flow…’ a series of 8, free yoga classes taught while our teacher wore their gear: https://www.soweflow.com/blogs/journal/tagged/video

About Jake:

Jake is the Founder of’So We Flow…’ (https://www.soweflow.com/), a company focused on men’s yoga and movement clothing.

Here’s a bit more about Jake, in his own words…

I originally discovered yoga when living in Morocco and co-owning a small internet-based branding and design agency. It came in the form of a skill exchange – daily yoga tuition for a new identity. I remember lying in Savasana at the end of my first practice realising I’d found something I wanted to pursue for a lifetime. I’d always been aware of yoga and superficially liked the idea – I just didn’t know how to approach it. For me, movement had been very much about exercise. And although at the time I’d have considered myself broad-minded and up-for-it, little did I know how yoga would take me to psychological and physical places surpassing anything I’d previously experienced.

Fast forward several years and yoga is a cornerstone of my life. Nothing else has offered me such profound mental, spiritual and physical growth and support. And that’s why I started so we flow… as a way to inspire more men to get involved – move and open their eyes to what can be unravelled and achieved through a dedicated practice – be it yoga or something else.

It’s still early days but I’m humbled by how the brand and products are evolving and flourishing in a busy world. Whatever happens we’ll stay true to our roots – creating understated, versatile and functional clothing that never compromises on quality and always considers the bigger picture, the people it helps turn on to yoga and those that make it all possible.

About Icewater Yoga:

Icewater Yoga is an online yoga platform offering hundreds of classes designed specifically for athletes.

Learn more about us: https://icewateryoga.com/

Questions:

Email us at info@icewateryoga.com to ask any questions you have about the podcast or anything else.

10-Minute Yoga Warm-Up for Athletes and Beginners

We don’t normally give away full classes for free but…

…we’re feeling extra generous this week!

As a companion class to the “Best Yoga Warm-Up for Athletes” video, we thought it would be cool to actually use Sun Salutation C in a real class setting and demonstrate how valuable it is to warm up for anything you’re about to do.

(Don’t be afraid to use it as a cool down either.)

The beauty of this warm-up is it’s patient. By taking your time and focusing on the breath first while warming up, you might notice a different state of mind as you begin your training session.

In just 10-minutes, you will have warmed-up your hamstrings, hips, back, spine, shoulders, chest, and neck. Feel free to use this as a regular part of your warm-up routine and make it a regular part of your program. Enjoy.

Start using yoga to live athletically: https://www.IcewaterYoga.com

Yoga for Athletes - The Ultimate Guide